Tips and Techniques to Apply for Motivated Staff and More Sales

Posts Tagged ‘Employment’

3 Steps to Stop Sickies

No Comments

Are you frustrated by workplace absence?sneezing

If you’re a business owner or a manager then absence can be a real pain! It’s inconvenient, it’s damaging to customer service, you lose sales and it costs your business money. And as we all know, not all days taken off work are due to genuine sickness. Many employees take a “sickie” because their morale is low and they just don’t like or can’t do their work.

Make people happy

The challenge for managers and team leaders is to make people happier at work. And if people are happy at work then they are less likely to take a day off every time they wake up with a stuffy nose. Some bosses think that paying more money, improving job security or working conditions is the answer.

It isn’t and it’s also something that can be very hard to achieve.

Get on their wavelength

People who employ or supervise others need to become more tuned to their employees’ emotional needs and find out what really motivates them. This is also much easier to achieve than paying more money or improving job security, however there is no quick fix. Some years ago I inherited a tele-sales operation with low staff morale and poor sales results. It took nearly six months to fix. The long-term benefits were of course worth it in terms of fewer days lost due to sickness and an increase in sales.

To reduce the number of sickies there are 3 steps you need to consider:

1. Pick the right person for the job.

You need to get better at interviewing and selecting people. Take more time over it; pay more attention to the applicant’s human side rather than their qualifications or experience. Get to know them better.

Find out what makes them happy, how well they get on with other people and how much energy and enthusiasm they have.

Make sure they know what they’re getting into and be sure the job suits them.

2. You need to believe in your people.

If you’ve interviewed well and picked the right person for the job then you need to trust them to do that job. You need to constantly demonstrate to your people that you trust and believe in them by what you say, your tone of voice and also by your body language.

If you believe that your people are not to be trusted, that they’re unable to make a decision without checking with you; that they’ll turn up late and go home early, then that’s exactly what they’ll do.

If on the other hand you believe that they’ll do their job well, that they can be trusted to make decisions, and they’ll give you a fair day’s work, then it’s more likely this is what you’ll get.

As with all theories there is no guarantee that it will work every time, however the majority of employees are reasonable people and if you treat them as such then they’re more likely to behave in a positive manner.

3. Give feedback and coach.

This is probably the most important thing you can do to motivate your team members.

This is where so many managers and team leaders fall down in dealing with their people; they’re hopeless at giving feedback.

Many managers are uncomfortable telling staff how they feel about their work performance be it good or bad.

Most employees want to know how they’re performing in their job; they want to know if they are doing it right or how they could do it better.

If you really want to motivate your people then you need to give them feedback on what they’re doing well and also – what needs improvement.

When you notice an employee doing something you do like, tell them about it. When you notice something you don’t like, tell them about it.

Do it as soon as possible. Acknowledging a job well done is not much good six months later. Also, if you don’t immediately call someone’s attention to something you’re not happy about, then they’ll assume its okay. Either that or they’ll think you didn’t notice or you don’t care.

Do it in private; why is it some managers still feel its okay to reprimand someone in front of their colleagues? Even the mildest rebuke can have a negative effect on morale.

So there you have it; these steps will take time and thought however they’ll make a huge difference as to how employees feel about their work.

If they feel good and gain satisfaction from their work then they are less likely to find a reason to ‘take a sickie’.

Excerpt from How to be a Motivational Manager51zNGdLr4YL._SL300_311

 

5 Factors of Successful Recruiting

No Comments

If you are a business owner or manager you’ll be very much aware of the need to:20130628-1652591

  • Find new customers
  • Hold onto the ones you have, and stop them buying from your competitors
  • Get them to buy more of your products or services

You obviously can’t do all this on your own so it’s vital to have the best people working for you.

However, many business people seem to believe that they can employ almost anyone and train them or control them to do the job.

Can you imagine a manager or coach of a sports team employing almost anyone for their team – of course not! They’ll always pick the best person to score the points, work well with the team and help win the championship.

Only when you have the best people, can you train and motivate them to achieve the three outcomes at the top of this page.

Know what you’re looking for

The time will come when you need to interview someone to join your business or your existing team. If you work in a large organisation then this could be someone from inside the company. You might even be the owner of a small business and about to start your first employee. Whatever the situation, you’re going to have to make a decision about whether this person is suitable for the job or not.

1. Can they deliver?

This is the number 1 factor of successful recruiting. It is absolutely vital that anyone you employ can deliver the outcomes you need.

These could be more orders, or more happy customers, or fast maintenance turnaround; it’s what you and your team are judged on. You need to be clear in your own mind as to the outcomes you need.

2. Will they fit the culture?

You need to think about whether the person you interview will be happy in your company and your culture. Some people who move from a large company to a much smaller one often find it hard to adjust.

Some years ago I moved from a large international organisation to a small local company. I went into the job with my eyes open and had three successful years. However I often felt frustrated in the smaller company mainly by their culture and the way they went about their business; I was glad when I moved back to a bigger organisation. I just wasn’t a “small company” person.

3. Will they fit with the team?

Will the job applicant fit well with the existing team? Maybe your team are a group of loners who don’t communicate with each other but it’s unlikely. You can’t pick people who are all the same; you don’t want a set of clones in your team. However you need to pick someone who is on the same wave-length as the rest of the team.

Perhaps you could involve a team member at a second interview, they might have a better feel for whether the person would fit or not.

4. Can they fit with your style?

How will the person respond to you, will they be able to work with your style of management.

I’ve had applicants complain about their existing boss – ‘Do you know that he expects me to do such and such.’ And I’ve thought to myself, ‘That’s exactly what I’d be expecting as well.’

You’ve got to have a good connection with this person that you bring into your team. That doesn’t mean to say that you’re going to be best buddies but you’ll need to be able to work together.

Consider if you’re the kind of manager who likes to work closely with your team and regularly check their progress. If so, you’ll need an individual who wants structure and detail and is comfortable with close monitoring.

If on the other hand, you’re the kind of manager who sets outcomes and leaves the team to get on with it without much help from you. Then you’re going to need someone who’s happy to work with minimum supervision.

5. Will they be happy?

Job applicants don’t know what they’re getting into when they start a new job. They might think they know, but how can they when they’ve never worked in your team or your company before. Just as it’s a risk for you when you start someone new, it’s also a risk for them. You’ll never totally eliminate the risk but it’s your job minimise the risk for both you and the applicant.

I’ve seen too many people start a new job and then find that it doesn’t suit them, they don’t like it and they want out. It causes problems for you as the manager; so I suggest you do every thing you can to avoid it.

It’s not easy

Picking people for your team is one of the most challenging and important jobs you’ll ever do. Use every bit of information you can get your hands on, read their resume and study any psychometric test that’s been done. However be as good an interviewer as you can be.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Treat Staff the Way They Expect to be Treated

No Comments

A branch manager friend of mine, Jennie, was telling me about a recent meeting she had with her boss. After discussingTeam Building some day to day issues he said, ‘Jennie, I have some good news; I’m sending you on another weekend team building event.’

Whoopee!

Jennie’s heart sunk, she remembered the previous event where they spent the day swinging through the trees, falling in the mud, building rope bridges and generally getting wet through.

Jennie isn’t particularly athletic and the aforementioned activities don’t exactly fill her with joy. She also has a husband and young children and she regards her weekends spent with them as very important.

Jennie is a very bright outgoing person; however she isn’t keen to do much socialising with her work colleagues. She doesn’t attend social events or the Christmas night out.

She is however a very successful manager. Her team consistently hit their target and her branch is the most successful in the company.

She runs a “tight ship” has a happy team with little absenteeism and is generally regarded as a first class manager.

He’s getting it wrong

Her boss believes that weekend team building events are good for morale, team spirit and very motivational. In Jennie’s case, it’s exactly the opposite; it’s totally de-motivational.

The Motivational Manager gets to know each individual member of their team. They are sensitive to how they see things and they know that they think differently than they do.

We all see the world in a different way based on our culture and how we were brought up.  It’s very important to understand this, particularly when you give your people feedback be it good or bad.

If you have good rapport with your people then you become sensitive to how they see things. The Motivational Manager understands each member of their team and doesn’t reward everyone in the same way.

I’ve often heard managers say – ‘I treat people the way I expect to be treated.’

The Motivational Manager says:

‘I treat people the way THEY expect to be treated.’ 

Excerpt from How to be a Motivational Manager51zNGdLr4YL._SL300_31

Enhanced by Zemanta

Employ People Who Think

No Comments

Old style management doesn’t encourage employees to think.not sure

That was certainly the case when I started work back in the bad old days, however it’s still prevalent in many businesses today.

It’s evident in many of the organisations that I work with that there’s a culture of – ‘I’m the boss – I tell you what to do – you don’t question it.’

The successful manager doesn’t react that way; he or she employs people who think!

They pick people with a mind of their own who aren’t afraid to say what they think and feel.

You need people who question, who challenge you as a manager.

If you want the job done…

I remember sitting in on a second interview with John, a manager client of mine who was interviewing candidates for a sales job. One of the candidates was a guy called Phil. He was a very strong character, full of questions and suggestions on how the job should be done.

John turned to me when Phil left the room – ‘That guy’s good, I reckon he’d be a good salesman for us, but I don’t think I could handle him.’

John was a much quieter type of person than Phil and I knew he felt uncomfortable with his style.

So I asked John – ‘What do you want this new salesman to do?’

‘I want him to bring in new business’ said John.

‘Do you think he can do that?’ I asked.

‘Of course I do, I just think he’ll be difficult to handle.’

It all comes down to outcomes. As a manager, what are you trying to achieve? What does your organisation and your boss want from you?

Don’t be scared

Of course you must consider how you’re going to work with a new team member, but you sometimes need to get out of your comfort zone and take a risk.

John hired Phil and he brought in the new business that John needed. Phil was always a handful and a challenge for John but they learned to work together.

Enhanced by Zemanta

How to Motivate Your Employees – Accept Them

No Comments

Do you know one thing that is very important to most of your employees?great dane

If you want highly motivated and engaged employees then you need to be aware how important it is to understand them as individuals.

It’s important because it’s important to them.

As Dr Phillip C McGraw says in his book – Life Strategies – ‘The number one need among all people is acceptance.’

Your team want to know that you accept them from a work point of view but they also want you to accept them for just who they are.

Find out as much as you can about your employees; their background, where they’re from, families, pets hobbies, sports and their views on the world.

Find out their philosophies and faiths; how they think and how they feel. Just think about it like any other relationship – what do you want to know about this person?

Now I’m not suggesting you sit around all day gazing into each others eyes or spend half the night on the phone. I’m suggesting you do this over time and slowly but surely, build up your understanding of this person.

I also know that you’re starting to get a bit nervous about this and might think its prying. You’re also thinking that your team members won’t want you to get to know them that well. Let me reassure you – most of them will, if it’s done discretely.

Almost everyone wants to know that someone is genuinely and positively interested in them. They may not always give that impression by their demeanor but trust me – they want to know you care; they want acceptance from you.

If they know you care about them, that you accept them, then your relationship will be much more productive, and your business much more successful.

Enhanced by Zemanta

The Five Factors of Successful Recruiting

No Comments

Are you absolutely sure you know what you’re looking for when you come to recruit a new member for your team?

1. Outcomes

This is the number 1 factor of successful recruiting. It is absolutely vital that anyone you employ can deliver the outcomes you need.

In a previous ‘Motivation Shot’ I wrote – Recruit People Who Can Deliver the Outcomes You Need. If you haven’t read it, go check it out and come back here.

There are four other factors you need to consider

2. Company structure

You need to think about whether the person you interview will be happy in your company and your culture. Some people who move from a large company to a much smaller one often find it hard to adjust.

Some years ago I moved from a large international organisation to a small local company. I went into the job with my eyes open and had three successful years. However I often felt frustrated in the smaller company mainly by their culture and the way they went about their business; I was glad when I moved back to a bigger organisation. I just wasn’t a ‘small company’ person.

I’ve interviewed people in a similar situation. I remember one lady who I interviewed for a sales agent’s job at one of my clients. She was keen to get the job, she had loads of experience, all the skills required and I was confident that she could do it. However, when describing her current job with a large company it became very apparent that she wouldn’t fit into this smaller one.

She kept talking about all the things they did in her present company and how she went about her daily duties. I knew that this job she was applying for was totally different from what she’d been used to. If I had employed her I believe that she wouldn’t be happy, would end up not doing a good job and would probably spend her time trying to find a new position.

3. The team

Will the job applicant fit well with the existing team? Maybe your team are a group of loners who don’t communicate with each other but it’s unlikely. You can’t pick people who are all the same; you don’t want a set of clones in your team. However you need to pick someone who is on the same wave-length as the rest of the team.
Perhaps you could involve a team member at a second interview, they might have a better feel for whether the person would fit or not.

4. Your style of managing

How will the person respond to you, will they be able to work with your style of management.
I’ve had applicants complain about their existing boss – “Do you know that he expects me to do such and such.” And I’ve thought to myself, “That’s exactly what I’d be expecting as well.”

You’ve got to have a good connection with this person that you bring into your team. That doesn’t mean to say that you’re going to be best buddies but you’ll need to be able to work together.
Consider if you’re the kind of manager who likes to work closely with your team and regularly check their progress. If so, you’ll need an individual who wants structure and detail and is comfortable with close monitoring.

If on the other hand, you’re the kind of manager who sets outcomes and leaves the team to get on with it without much help from you. Then you’re going to need someone who’s happy to work with minimum supervision.

I once made a mistake with a guy I appointed into a field sales job. Because he was a college graduate I felt that he would be able to pick up the knowledge and selling skills really fast.

I’m the second type of manager I described above. I tell people what the outcomes are and let them find their way to achieving them. I keep in contact and give feedback when they do well and also when they need to improve things.

However this guy was at me all the time – “What do I do next, where do I go now, how do I do it?” This of course took up too much of my time. The others in the team made decisions themselves and regularly checked with me. This guy was a ‘bad fit,’ it didn’t work and he left very soon of his own accord.

5. They need to be happy

Job applicants don’t know what they’re getting into when they start a new job. They might think they know but how can they when they’ve never worked in your team or you company before. Just as it’s a risk for you when you start someone new, it’s also a risk for them. You’ll never totally eliminate the risk but it’s your job minimise the risk for both you and the applicant.

I’ve seen too many people start a new job and then find that it doesn’t suit them, they don’t like it and they want out. It causes problems for you as the manager; so I suggest you do every thing you can to avoid it.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
%d bloggers like this: